Tricolored Heron Following the Fish

This Tricolored Heron was patiently following some small fish up the inlet. Stepping forward slowly, slowly.

Tricolored Heron on Bank
Tricolored Heron on Bank

Yes, he got a very tiny fish! It looks a little bigger in his shadow, but still hardly seemed worth the time he put in.

Tricolored Heron with Fish
Tricolored Heron with Fish

The school of small fish inched along, too.

Tricolored Heron on Bank
Tricolored Heron on Bank

The heron kept following, but got further from the water, for a different vantage point.

Tricolored Heron on Bank
Tricolored Heron on Bank

The bank is very steep and the late afternoon sun highlighted some interesting layers of color in the dirt.

Tricolored Heron on Bank
Tricolored Heron on Bank

Pond View

The tree in the center of this image is where I spotted the Black-bellied Whistling Duck featured in my earlier post. The duck was a bonus as I wanted to take some landscape images as the sun went down. The water was smooth for reflections and the light just faded quietly away.

Pond
Pond,  just before sundown, zoom in to see Whistling Duck at top of center tree

The water here seems higher than last summer. There are very few water lilies compared to last year and many of the trees around the pond perimeter show little sign of life at a distance.

July 28, 2018, about 40 minutes before sunset.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck

This is the first Whistling Duck I have seen in South Carolina. He was perched high in a tree over a pond and I couldn’t even tell what it was until I zoomed in on the image in my camera.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Tree
Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Tree

The duck periodically threw his head back and made a very un-duck like sounding call.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Tree
Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Tree

A pair of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks flew by, but didn’t slow down to listen to the one in the tree and he didn’t make any effort to join them.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck Pair Flying
Black-bellied Whistling Duck Pair Flying

There was still about a half hour until sunset, but the sun, which was behind me, was disappearing into a cloud bank, taking the light and any possibility of a colorful sunset with it.

Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Tree
Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Tree

Wood Stork Take Off

Wood Storks take a few hops before they get into the air when taking off from water.

Wood Stork Taking Off
Wood Stork Taking Off

Then they lift their legs up behind them and give a few strong beats of their wings.

Wood Stork Taking Off
Wood Stork Taking Off

And away they go.

Wood Stork Taking Off
Wood Stork Taking Off

If I have the opportunity to see this again I’ll have a better idea of what is going to happen and maybe get an image of the hop.

Tree Top Landing: Spoonbill

Most of the Roseate Spoonbills were congregated in the corners of the pond by mid-morning. They had done stopped feeding and were preening and napping. A few decided to perch in a tree instead.

Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop
Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop

Landing spot selection is risk business.

Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop
Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop

The pine bough he landed on didn’t hold his weight.

Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop
Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop, Dragonfly photobomber

The Spoonbill sprung back into the air, made a short hop and chose a sturdier spot in the next pine tree.

Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop
Roseate Spoonbill Landing in Treetop