Brown Dragonfly

On our photography tour at the Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center I saw a few dragonflies, that mostly eluded me as they fed at high speed.

Dragonfly
Dragonfly

This one took a rest on a nicely placed reed. Just as I was getting in place with a good angle for the background I felt a sharp bite on my leg. Ants! Needless to say that was the end of those pictures as I spent five minutes getting the little buggers off me and out of my shoes.

Dragonfly
Dragonfly

Ibis Notes

Reminding me of musical notes on a staff these White Ibis were writing a song in a dead tree.

White Ibis in Tree
White Ibis in Tree

However, they weren’t all carrying the same tune, and seemed to covet each others’ spots.

White Ibis in Tree
White Ibis in Tree

Being “king of the hill” is a popular bird theme.

White Ibis in Tree
White Ibis in Tree

Pushing right to the limit, this fellow held a long note.

White Ibis in Tree
White Ibis in Tree

I circled around to get better light and most of the Ibis had moved on to another song.

White Ibis in Tree
White Ibis in Tree

Alligator Climb

I watched this Alligator swimming deliberately towards the ramp. He circled underneath and then headed for the low end.

Alligator Swimming to Ramp
Alligator Swimming to Ramp

I’ve seen, and documented, Alligators climbing onto  a ramp before so I was pretty sure what was coming next.

Alligator Swimming to Ramp
Alligator Swimming to Ramp

With a heave his head and neck were out of the water.

Alligator Climbing onto Ramp
Alligator Climbing onto Ramp

And in one motion he smoothly propelled onto the ramp.

Alligator Climbing onto Ramp
Alligator Climbing onto Ramp

He started to flail a bit and I thought he might not make it.

Alligator Climbing onto Ramp
Alligator Climbing onto Ramp

He persisted and one of his back legs caught the edge.

Alligator Climbing onto Ramp
Alligator Climbing onto Ramp

Success!

Alligator on Ramp
Alligator on Ramp

Matching Steps

Not just people like walking on the beach.

Oyster Catcher Walking the Beach
Oyster Catcher Walking the Beach

There’s something about having sand between your toes that is satisfying.

Oyster Catcher Walking the Beach
Oyster Catcher Walking the Beach

Oystercatcher U5 was reported to the American Oystercatcher Working Group.

The American Oystercatcher Working Group seeks to develop, support and implement range-wide research and management efforts that promote the conservation of Atlantic coast American Oystercatchers and their habitats through individual and partnership-based initiatives guided by recommendations of the Working Group’s membership. http://amoywg.org/

Juvenile Little Blue Heron in the Flowers

This juvenile Little Blue Heron was just poking along in between the swamp sunflowers.

Juvenile Little Blue Heron
Juvenile Little Blue Heron

Their preferred hunting ground is in the water which was just behind this flower clump, but herons will eat insects and anoles found on dry land.

Juvenile Little Blue Heron
Juvenile Little Blue Heron

This fellow in with the flowers was a nice picture, even if he didn’t find any lunch.

Juvenile Little Blue Heron
Juvenile Little Blue Heron

White Ibis, Dark Pond

I occasionally take a walk to this small pond after checking out the action on the big pond. The pond has  a full tree canopy so the light is usually poor for photographs, but late in the day some dappled sun works through. And some days the walk rewards me with a bird.

White Ibis
White Ibis

This trip it was an adult White Ibis, slowing working his way back and forth, in and out of the patches of sunlight.

White Ibis
White Ibis

Then something startled him and he retreated to a spot above the water at the back of the pond, where he carefully checked the sky.

White Ibis
White Ibis

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat Warblers, either female or immature, but still looking pretty snazzy, entertained me as they flitted in and out of some marsh grass and cattails.

Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat

There were at least two, and may have been more; it was hard to tell as they zipped in and out of the underbrush.

Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat

Most of the time they were down in the thicker clumps, but did give me a few clearer views.

Common Yellowthroat
Common Yellowthroat

Nature’s Camoflage

Spotting wildlife is often about subtle contrasts and shapes. The subject’s movement sometimes helps. This Sapsucker flew onto the tree then froze in place.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Looking for the unexpected can help.

Tree Frog
Tree Frog

Some creatures hardly move, like the Tree Frog, and others, like this warbler, are in perpetual motion so it’s helpful to anticipate their next direction.

Black-and-white Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler