Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbills Duo

I’m always curious about bird behavior, partly because knowing what to expect can help get a better image. Seeing these two Roseate Spoonbills wading towards each other, I wondered if they would just cross paths, join together, or would one cause the other to take flight.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

This time, the younger Spoonbill, on the left, turned and went with the elder.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

The older bird, seen in the rear below, has a green head and darker pink patches on his wings that come with age. The younger bird still has some fluffy white feathers on his head.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

The pair stayed together, moving further away from me.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

8 thoughts on “Roseate Spoonbills Duo”

  1. I love the fact that the two of them are together. When I read about the differences, it’s a little tough to understand–side-by-side comparisons really do help a lot.

  2. Stalking fish the same way an Englishman does with a fly rod!

    I watched a dozen loons one day, gathered in a circle. Each would take a turn and run around the circle on the surface while beating its wings on the water. After this went on for a while, they stopped and sort of looked at each other silently. Then they all dove out of sight.
    They were corralling a school of fish tightly before diving to catch them. A once-in-a-lifetime sight.

    Great spoonbill series!

    Paz

    1. Thanks, Belinda, we’ve really enjoyed having quite a few at the wildlife areas the past month or so. LOL, at least distantly! Kidding aside, I do not know if they stay with their parental group as they grow up–that’s a good question.

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