Tag Archives: Roseate Spoonbill

Pink and Gray

Or, Roseate and Gray if you want to be fancy. Either way I’ve always liked the color combination even if it didn’t make a great background for these photographs. This was a gray day and the mud was gray in this inlet where the tide was just starting to come back in.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

A group of fifteen Spoonbills was coming and going looking for the best feeding spots and seemed oblivious to the coating of mud on their legs.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

With perfect form this one dropped in…

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

…for a nice clean landing.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

Oops, an extra step as the mud brought him to a stop.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

Click on any photo for a larger view.

Reflections of a Spoonbill

Still water, perfect light and a position on a berm above the pond for me yielded some lovely reflections of this Roseate Spoonbill taking a stroll.

Roseate Spoonbill Reflection
Roseate Spoonbill Reflection

He was in no particular hurry, just wandered along

Roseate Spoonbill Reflection
Roseate Spoonbill Reflection

When he moved into the water a small ripple formed behind him.

Roseate Spoonbill Reflection
Roseate Spoonbill Reflection

Do they see that bird looking back at them?

Click on any photo for larger view.

10/08/2017

Spoonbill Making His Own Shower

Roseate Spoonbills are still around in a couple Wildlife Management Areas we visit along the coast of South Carolina. The bird resources all indicate that they don’t belong here, especially not well into fall, but we have seen flocks of six to forty.

This one was taking advantage of a shallow pond to get cleaned up.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

He went through this ritual five or six times that I watched. Too much water in the air becomes blown out in the sun and behind him was shaded so I didn’t get much scenery to go with the shower. This development of the photos adds to the action.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

He moved an amazing volume of water flapping his wings up and down.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

Click on any photo for larger view.

Follow The Leader

It was a glorious morning. A flock of Spoonbills was feeding in one of the wildlife management area ponds led by one bird along the edge of a sandbar. A gathering of Ibis, Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets were partially hidden in the grass behind them.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills – click photo for larger view

All of the birds worked their way towards the other side of the pond, some a few at a time, others in groups. Below, Spoonbills and Ibis lifted off together.

Roseate Spoonbills and Ibis
Roseate Spoonbills and Ibis  – click photo for larger view

This was one of the first cool (60 degrees F) mornings we’ve had this fall. That along with a stiff breeze kept the mosquitoes away adding to the morning’s pleasure.

Taken 10/01/2017.

Roseate Spoonbills

You have to love the pink. Actually, what’s not to love about a Spoonbill?

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills – click on photo for larger view

The profile of a mature Roseate Spoonbill in flight shows off that fabulous pink and the bill well adapted for feeding in shallow water.

Roseate Spoonbill in Flight
Roseate Spoonbill in Flight – click on photo for larger view

The Spoonbills in this group are younger with less color, but still something to look at.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills and Tricolor Heron  – click on photo for larger view

Their flight seems effortless and like most of the large wading birds they are masters of the glide.

Roseate Spoonbill in Flight
Roseate Spoonbill in Flight  – click on photo for larger view

Tricolored Heron Just Wanted Some Space

The Tricolored Herons are more solitary birds than some of the waders and we don’t see them as often as their larger relatives. This Great Egret landed almost on top of this Tricolor.

Tricolored Heron and Greet Egret
Tricolored Heron and Great Egret

The Great Egret was quickly followed by a Roseate Spoonbill. There must have been something good in the water.

Tricolored Heron and Greet Egret
Tricolored Heron, Great Egret, and Roseate Spoonbill

The Tricolored Heron selected another spot where he could have some room.

Tricolored Heron
Tricolored Heron

There he was able to fish in peace, at least for a few minutes.

Tricolored Heron
Tricolored Heron

Spoonbills Get Points for Style

This group of wading birds was moving down the impoundment as a pack, presumably following the fish.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbills moving with the crowd that includes Great Egrets and Stilts with Wood Storks and more Egrets in the back

Many of the Roseate Spoonbills broke off on their own, preferring to feed in smaller groups or maybe needing shallower water. This older Spoonbill, identifiable by the darker pink on his wings, gets points for the big “swoosh” of water.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

Setting up for the landing with uneven feet is awkward, but he pulled it off,

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

A near miss, this elegant landing scores extra for not disturbing his neighbor and for carrying a blade of marsh grass on his beak through the flight.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

Click any photo for larger view.