All posts by Ellen Jennings

Roseate Spoonbills, Framed and Not

This Roseate Spoonbill got pushed out of the community tree but found a nearby perch to re-group.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

This one dropped lower in the tree to get his own space, framed by the branches.

Roseate Spoonbill, Framed by Gnarly Tree
Roseate Spoonbill, Framed by Gnarly Tree

I’m sure I commented last year that I would never be surprised to see this tree had succumbed to the forces of nature but here it still stands.

January 916, 2020

A Spoonie Tree Full

We call it the Spoonie Tree because the Roseate Spoonbills often perch there, but it really is first come, first served and this year I’ve seen more Double-crested Cormorants than Spoonbills.

Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorant, Snowy Egret
Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorant, Snowy Egret

The Cormorants were just enjoying the sun and grooming, but the Spoonbills had a need to agitate.

Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorant, Snowy Egret
Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorant, Snowy Egret

Getting an image with all heads up didn’t work out that day.

Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorant, Snowy Egret
Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorants, Snowy Egret

The Snowy Egrets came and went, mostly ignored by the others.

Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorant, Snowy Egret
Roseate Spoonbills, Double-crested Cormorants, Snowy Egrets

January 16, 2020
Donnelley Wildlife Management Area, SC

Triplet Windows, From the Inside

Almost two years ago I posted photographs of these windows from the outside in Triplet Windows.

A couple weeks ago when passing by on my way to the nature trail the back door was open. I stepped in and got the answer to my question about their position: they are centered over the kitchen sink.

Boynton House, Kitchen Looking Out
Boynton House, Kitchen Looking Out

Those with kitchen duty had a lovely view into a pine forest.

Boynton House, Kitchen Looking Out
Boynton House, Kitchen Looking Out

The house, well on its way to ruin, was once the hub of a thriving cattle farm. The property is maintained by the SC Department of Natural Resources; periodically they trim back overgrowing vegetation, which may help it last a few more years.

Boynton House
Boynton House

Wood Storks Feeding

Last fall the land managers let this old rice field dry out and some vegetation flourished, then died back over the winter, leaving tall stalks and weed trees. Sometime over the winter water was let back in, and now covers the field.

Wood Storks Feeding
Wood Storks Feeding

The wading birds are happy to poke around looking for food, including this small flock of Wood Storks.

Wood Storks Feeding
Wood Storks Feeding

I thought they were coming back toward me, but they quickly did another u-turn and moved to the back of the field.

Wood Storks Feeding
Wood Storks Feeding