Category Archives: Nature

Shore Birds Wading

This pair of shore birds, probably Lesser Yellowlegs, worked their way up a marsh inlet as the tide was going out, probing for breakfast.

Wading Shore Birds
Wading Shore Birds

Other Yellowlegs that I have seen actually have obvious yellow legs. I’m not sure if this pair is just too muddy to tell for sure or if it’s their age.

Wading Shore Birds
Wading Shore Birds

Or they are a different bird. The Merlin identification app also suggested they might be Long-billed Dowitchers.

Wading Shore Birds
Wading Shore Birds

They didn’t find much sustenance when I was watching, but they were pretty in the morning sun.

Wading Shore Birds
Wading Shore Birds

Wasp Architechture

From a distance this wasp nest looked like a dried flower head jammed into these branches. When I got close enough to see the insect movement I could tell that it was not a flower at all.

Wasps on Nest
Wasps on Nest

It’s interesting that the nest appeared to have a uniform depth and I couldn’t tell what was supporting the disk. The wasps were crawling around the outside of the nest, not coming and going as I would have expected.

Wasps on Nest
Wasps on Nest

He Must Know Something

All this empty shoreline and you had to land here?

Great Blue Heron and Great Egret
Great Blue Heron and Great Egret

The Great Blue Heron was tucked out of my sight until the Great Egret touched down.

Great Blue Heron and Great Egret
Great Blue Heron and Great Egret

The wading birds follow each other, usually hoping to capitalize on a good fishing opportunity. Why else would the Great Blue Heron have chosen this spot?

Great Blue Heron and Great Egret
Great Blue Heron and Great Egret

King of the Hill

I try not to anthropomorphize the wildlife I see but there often are similarities in the behavior, if not the intention, to human activity. These Roseate Spoonbills did their version of King of the Hill for at least an hour, with no obvious winner.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

In addition to wanting to be top bird, some of them also wanted to dismantle the “hill,” removing twigs from the main branch, eventually dropping them.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

Some squabbling broke out, but wasn’t serious enough for any of them to leave.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

The pond wasn’t very deep and those pushed off the limb easily stood in the water, until they decided to push another bird off.

Roseate Spoonbills on Stick Pile
Roseate Spoonbills on Stick Pile

Click on any image for larger view.

Juvenile Green Heron

This juvenile Green Heron was just sitting in the water. He eventually splashed a little, but he seemed content just to be wet on this hot June day.

Juvenile Green Heron
Juvenile Green Heron

This pool is part of a pond / fountain system of moving water in a Charleston city park. This tree is at the edge of a small island in the pond that houses a Green Heron rookery. The water is cloudy so you can’t see bottom to tell what color it might be painted but may be the cause of the odd color.

Juvenile Green Heron
Juvenile Green Heron

The heron eventually climbed out of the water and shook off before settling down in the shade.

Juvenile Green Heron
Juvenile Green Heron

Sony Alpha-6500, Sony 55-210 MM lens

Here’s The Catch: Predator and Prey

Blogger Liz, author of New Zealand based Exploring Colour, has collected a group of “Predator and Prey” posts from photography blogs that she follows. Check out these fascinating images and stories of the world around us that I and fellow photographers have documented.

Exploring Colour

The reality of the natural world is that some creatures eat other creatures to survive. Nature photographers spend a lot of time outside and sometimes capture dramatic moments in the struggle for survival. Their photos and stories may shock us but we can learn so much from these encounters – animals seem capable of much more planning, strategy and applied knowledge than what most of us humans ever give them credit for.


** Click on any photo to view large-size version **

Note: Each photographer’s website/blog is listed at the bottom of this blog-post.


snake2_fish_blog

Mike Powell | Snake catches catfish | 20 July, 2017

  • Story plus 5 Photos showing the snake in various positions holding his catch, all the time in the water, until all of a sudden the snake somehow ingests the large fish and the last photo shows the snake with only the fish tail sticking out of…

View original post 409 more words

Old Shed Transformation

I was intrigued by this old shed on the grounds of Swan Lake Iris Gardens when we visited in early February. The boards and vines made an interesting collage.

Old Shed in February
Old Shed – February 1, 2018

On last week’s visit I was delighted to see the shed covered in trumpet vine and looking somewhat like a Chia Pet, with an elephant trunk.

Shed Covered with Trumpet Vine
Shed Covered with Trumpet Vine -May 21, 2018

I’m not that familiar with Trumpet Vine and don’t know how the blooming process goes. There were just a few blooms fully trumpeting and I wonder if this shed will be covered with blossoms. Trumpet Vine is a favorite of humming birds but I didn’t see any.

Trumpet Vine Closeup
Trumpet Vine Closeup

If you aren’t familiar, “Chia Pets are American styled terracotta figurines used to sprout chia, where the chia sprouts grow within a couple of weeks to resemble the animal’s fur or hair.”
— Wikipedia.
What seemed like a fad, these do-it-yourself kits have been around since the 1970s. Everything from cats and dogs to political figures have been represented. The jingle is now rattling around in my head.

Colorful Caterpillar

This colorful caterpillar stood out from the plain greenery which he was eating, which is how I happened to see him. A mob of Red-winged Black Birds was in the area and I was expecting him to get picked off as I watched.

Caterpillar
Caterpillar

He was methodically consuming the leaf, munching back and forth straight across the top.

Caterpillar
Caterpillar

A wider view shows there was some red foliage nearby, which may have helped camouflage him.

Caterpillar
Caterpillar  – Sony Alpha 6500

4/26/2018 On the dike at Magnolia Plantation & Gardens.

Fox Squirrel

About twice the size of a grey squirrel, the Fox Squirrel can be found scattered around the coastal areas of South Carolina. This was the first time I got a really good look at one and some pictures other than a fleeing butt end.

Fox Squirrel
Fox Squirrel

He jumped from the ground to the side of the tree just like a common grey squirrel would. I was ready for him to go up the tree, but instead he just sprung off into space and zipped away.

Fox Squirrel
Fox Squirrel — a little over two feet long, including the tail

The body of the Fox Squirrel can be grey, black or brown. All of the color variations share the black face mask and white nose and ear tips.