October Dragonflies

Going back to a warm October day when a number of dragonflies were flying over the pond and occasionally stopping for rest.

Dragonfly on Dried Grass
Dragonfly on Dried Grass

A few even landed on a tree at a height I could capture.

Eastern Pondhawk on Tree
Eastern Pondhawk on Tree

This pair entertained me as one or both repositioned just as I thought I had the shot. I thought it was interesting that they would land so close together.

Eastern Pondhawks on Tree
Eastern Pondhawks on Tree

Ravenswood Pond, Magnolia Plantation & Gardens, Charleston, SC
October 12, 2021

 

Burrowing Owl, Center For Birds of Prey, October

I first photographed this zippy Burrowing Owl last June then saw him again in October at Photography Day.

Burrowing Owl
Burrowing Owl, Radio Transmitter

He wasn’t doing anything different on this day, but he sure was cute. And zippy.

Burrowing Owl
Burrowing Owl

Safety first, he watched all movement overhead where some vultures were swooping around.

Burrowing Owl
Burrowing Owl

With the danger passed, he posed on a higher perch.

Burrowing Owl
Burrowing Owl

The Center for Birds of Prey, Awenda, SC
Photography Day, October 10, 2021

Little Blue Heron Fishing

A Little Blue Heron was fishing in the last trickle of water left in the lagoon at Magnolia Cemetery Pond: Water Out

Little Blue Heron Fishing
Little Blue Heron Fishing

The orange/red reflections from the end of the autumn leaves made an interesting scene from what was basically mud.

Little Blue Heron Fishing
Little Blue Heron Fishing

The Heron didn’t have much luck, but was very persistant.

Little Blue Heron Fishing
Little Blue Heron Fishing

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC
December 3, 2021

Magnolia Cemetery Pond: Water Out

I like Magnolia Cemetery mostly for the birds that gather there. On this early December visit I was surprised to find the water was out of the pond where I was hoping to see some ducks. Normally the water is a foot or more deep at this edge.

Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery
Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery

On doing research for this post I discovered the body of water is referred to as a lagoon not a pond; there is this “big lagoon” and a “small lagoon” on the back side near the Smith Pyramid. I’ve read about those stairs leading down to a grassy area where picnicking took place back in the 1800s, which seems odd now but was all the rage at the time.

Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery
Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery, Taken from the cemetery entrance  end

From the other end of the pond, looking towards Meeting Street, signs of expanding Charleston are evident. I don’t often post images with power lines, but this time they felt like part of the story. Bird watching at the cemetery you feel like you are in the country, but that just isn’t so.

Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery
Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery, White Ibis in Trees to Right

Unfortunately, the bridge has been closed since last summer due to dangerous rotting of the decking. The last time I walked over it I wondered why it hadn’t been closed.

On the marsh end of the pond/lagoon there is a different type of water control trunk than those I am used to seeing in the rice fields.

Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery
Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery

This one is mostly brick or some kind of masonry with a metal plate cover and hoisting system. A few White Ibis were attracted to the shallow water for easy feeding.

Outflow of Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery
Outflow of Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery, White Ibis

The marsh on the other side of the dike is tidal, leading out to the Cooper River. With the trunk left open water will come and go in the pond with the tide. I’m not sure why they are leaving it open; I was there a few days ago and it was either open again or still open.

Outflow of Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery
Outflow of Big Lagoon, Magnolia Cemetery

My post School’s Out  of jumping fish was taken on the marsh side of this dike, with the tide high. The last image shows the top of the brick arrangement on that side.

The building to the right is an old receiving tomb; Ted has taken some moody images of it which you can see at https://tpjphoto.net/

My trend lately has been less text with my posts; I think today is an anomaly, not a new direction.

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC
December 3, 2021

Resurrection Fern, On Brick

Resurrection Fern is the common name of the species Polypodium polypodioides, a plant  that grows on the surface of other plants and trees, and is most well known on Live Oaks around the Low Country of South Carolina. It springs to life when it rains, then slowly dries up, appearing dead.

Conversation with New Zealand blogger Ms. Liz about her post of a fern at Exploringcolour.wordpress.com/ has inspired me to work on ferns today. I thought I’d start small.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall

These fronds are typically 4 to 12 inches (10 to 30 centimeters) in length (National Wildlife Federation) and this particular collection was smaller.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall, Dried Magnolia Seed Pod

The images in today’s post are of the fern growing on this  brick wall that encloses a cemetery plot. A one inch (2.5 cm) plus rainfall the day before had worked its magic and the fern was looking quite lively. I suspect squirrels use this wall as a lunch spot accounting for the partially chewed Magnolia seed pod.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall, Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC

I’m using the term Resurrection Fern loosely here, as it appears to me there are multiple variations and I know nothing about more specific identification.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC
December 31, 2021

I’ve posted about this fern a few times and it’s not uncommon for it to appear in other images along side a bird. Other Resurrection Fern Posts