Tag Archives: Snowy Egret

Lining the Banks

Wading birds and alligators gathered along this marsh inlet as the tide was going out.

Wading Birds and Alligators
Wading Birds and Alligators

The Snowy Egrets changed position frequently, they seem happiest when flapping around. The other egrets and herons tended to stick to their claimed spot, even as the alligators passed by.

Wading Birds Lining the Shore
Wading Birds Lining the Shore

Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Little Blue Heron, Tricolored Heron,  and White Ibis shared the banks.

Snowy Egrets Synchronized Flying

And the chase was on. It was hard to tell who was who. These two Snowy Egrets were trying to impress a prospective mate.

Snowy Egrets
Snowy Egrets

The flying skill was quite impressive.

Their feet and bills have turned from yellow to orange for mating season.

Snowy Egrets
Snowy Egrets

Where this duo finally landed was a bit far for a good shot, but there was no mistaking the mating dance.

Snowy Egrets
Snowy Egrets

The Great Egret sitting on her nest was unperturbed by all this activity and a third Snowy Egret tucked himself out of the way.

Snowy Egrets
Snowy Egrets

Bathing Hole

When I first arrived at the end of the boardwalk at St. Augustine Alligator Farm a Great Egret had this little corner to himself. He was just sitting there, not actively bathing, but dunking a little. No Alligators were in the immediate vicinity, that I could see.

Great Egret Chest Deep in Water
Great Egret Chest Deep in Water

Even though he wasn’t doing anything to attract attention he soon had company, as first a Roseate Spoonbill sauntered over, a Snowy Egret dropped in, and then a White Ibis joined the group. The White Ibis, with a splash of mud on his wings, was most in need of a rinse.

White Ibis, Great Egret, Roseate Spoonbill and Snowy Egret
White Ibis, Great Egret, Roseate Spoonbill and Snowy Egret

The dirt look to the Spoonbill’s feathers is the transition to the darker pink/red that happens as they mature.

1/29/2018, St. Augustine Alligator Farm, St. Augustine, Florida.

Snowy Egret

Snowy Egrets are easily identified if you can see their feet: bright yellow and rather clownish looking.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

They also have trouble with their hair-dos, another factor that adds to their comical persona. They dance around when they feed to stir up fish settled to the bottom of creeks or ponds, often tossing their heads causing those extra long feathers to bounce.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

This one was just standing around at the edge of the wildlife drive, showing off his feet.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

Black Point Wildlife Drive, Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, Florida, 1/28/2018.

Snowy Egret

This Snowy Egret is likely a regular around this small pond. He was content for me to walk by as he surveyed they area from this cement embankment near the road.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

Then I took one step too close and he lifted up onto a dead branch and proceeded to twist around for some personal grooming.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

The branch hung out over the pond and I was able to move around the corner and get a couple different backgrounds as he posed one legged.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

I wanted to get the nice green palm fronds or the flowering Crepe Myrtle that edged the pond but as it turns out I would have had to have my feet with the alligators to get those shots.

Snowy Egret
Snowy Egret

Click on any photo for larger view.

Green Reflections

A pair of Juvenile Snowy Egrets were using the alligator platform to practice strutting their stuff.

Juvenile Snowy Egrets
Juvenile Snowy Egrets

Their reflections were interrupted by the duckweed, but I liked the tree reflections across the water.

Juvenile Snowy Egrets
Juvenile Snowy Egrets

This platform sits just off one of the islands where several Snowy Egrets nested. We could hear them but have rarely seen them.