Tag Archives: Roseate Spoonbill

Treetop Roseate Spoonbills

I had been hoping to find some Roseate Spoonbills feeding in the pond.

Treetop Roseate Spoonbills
Treetop Roseate Spoonbills

Instead a group of six or eight were hanging around in some tree tops, probably waiting for the tide to go out so they could feed.

Treetop Roseate Spoonbills
Treetop Roseate Spoonbills

A couple of them were quietly resting while the others kept nattering away at each other and the tree.

Treetop Roseate Spoonbills
Treetop Roseate Spoonbills

They were grabbing the branches with their beaks apparently just for entertainment as they only eat crustaceans out of the water.

Treetop Roseate Spoonbills
Treetop Roseate Spoonbills

Alligator Sliding Into the Pond

When I saw the big Alligator moving I was ready for the Spoonbills to fly or the Alligator on the right to react. Anything.

Alligator and Spoonbills
Alligator and Spoonbills

No, this time the Alligator slid into the water without any fanfare; none of the other creatures cared at all.

Alligator and Spoonbills
Alligator and Spoonbills

Evidently the big guy didn’t have any cares either, and just floated in place once he cleared the bank.

Alligator and Spoonbills
Alligator and Spoonbills

Post 999

Word Press tells me this is my 999th post on Passing By Photo. My first blog post was four years ago yesterday and I’ve seen some amazing things along the way. It’s been my goal to share images that show the beauty of nature, birds and animals, and some non-natural things I’ve passed by, with a bit of text to give context.

Four years ago I could not image all of the marvelous things I would see and photograph, including Roseate Spoonbills.

Tree of Roseate Spoonbills
Tree of Roseate Spoonbills

I have great fun doing this and offer many thanks to all of you that have followed along, commented and liked my posts.

Here’s to another 999!

 

Lined Up in the Fog

After seeing the Tundra Swans in the fog we drove around a perimeter road at Bear Island  Wildlife Management Area Sunday morning. We came upon this line of Roseate Spoonbills and pair of Avocents standing in a shallow pond.

Spoonbills and Avocets
Spoonbills and Avocets

The Avocets flew off and the Spoonbills milled around.

Spoonbills Standing Around
Spoonbills Standing Around

The fog didn’t dissipate much, even by 9:30 am, but the light was shifting and oddly the air didn’t feel wet. The Spoonbills didn’t seem to mind and performed their usual behaviors.

Spoonbills Standing Around
Spoonbills Standing Around

We have been seeing groups of up to 25 Roseate Spoonbills in a few locations in this general area. Interestingly they are all juveniles with fully feathered heads. As they mature over three years their pink color darkens and they loose most of their head feathers.

 

Drama in the Spoonie Tree

In my last post,¬†Snowy Egret, Blue Water, I mentioned that the Snowy Egrets can be feisty. This action took place in the “Spoonie Tree,” so named because the Roseate Spoonbills tend to gather there as a second Snowy Egret came in for a landing.

Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets
Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets

Even though their perches were several feet apart, the incoming Snowy Egret was considered an interloper.

Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets
Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets

He who was there first drove the second egret off.

Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets
Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets

After the action was over the Roseate Spoonbill had a quick squawk, but otherwise didn’t move.

Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets
Spoonbill and Snowy Egrets