Tag Archives: Insect

Spider: Arrow-shaped Micrathena

A tiny creature, and new to me with those serious looking spikes, this Arrow-shaped Micrathena is only about 0.25 inches (6 mm) long.

Arrow-shaped Micrathena
Arrow-shaped Micrathena

A second one was in a more secretive spot in a plant.

Arrow-shaped Micrathena
Arrow-shaped Micrathena

The visible stabilimentum, the zigzagged strand of webbing, seen above the spider in the next image is how I happened to notice the spider as it waved in the afternoon breeze.

Arrow-shaped Micrathena
Arrow-shaped Micrathena

August 13, 2021

Bee Sculpture

The early morning sun was glinting off this hive, which  unfortunately was so high up I couldn’t get a sharper image.

Bees at Work
Bees at Work

I thought it was interesting with those lobes, and wondered if that was wax, or some sort of paper nest.

Bee at Work
Bees at Work

From the other side, if I had approached from the direction I probably wouldn’t have noticed it.

Bee at Work
Bees at Work

This last image is severely cropped, and not great detail, but notice how precise the cells are–an engineering marvel!

Bees at Work
Bees at Work

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Charleston, SC
August 20, 2021

Needham’s Skimmer on Salvia

I believe this is a Needham’s Skimmer, female, showing off on yet another interesting perch.

Needham's Skimmer on Salvia
Needham’s Skimmer on Salvia

This bed of Salvia was inside a box hedged garden, limiting my angle.

Needham's Skimmer on Salvia
Needham’s Skimmer on Salvia

There was considerable wear and tear on the insect’s wings but as usual I saw no sign it inhibited her movement.

Needham's Skimmer on Salvia
Needham’s Skimmer on Salvia

Middleton Place
July 7, 2021

Needham’s Skimmers

A number of Needham’s Skimmers joined me on walk in early July, or maybe I joined them as they flitted ahead of me on an old rice field dike.

I like this image for the shadow on the leaf.

Needham’s Skimmer
Needham’s Skimmer

In all of these images the concentration of color at the front of the wings, which distinguishes the Needham’s Skimmer from some others, is obvious.

Needham’s Skimmer
Needham’s Skimmer

That helps more for ID than the amorphous “Needham’s abdomen averages a bit redder” when compared to the Golden Skimmer.

Needham’s Skimmer
Needham’s Skimmer

July 4, 2021

Unknown Insect

I spotted this long legged insect taking a walking journey on a Texas Star Hibiscus plant.

Unknown Insect
Unknown Insect

Black and white antennae and a weirdly translucent body made him look somewhat alien.

Unknown Insect
Unknown Insect

Or at least the stuff horror movies are made of. Good thing he was tiny, and hopefully not an invasive or destructive beast.

Unknown Insect
Unknown Insect

Backyard Insect, July 5, 2021

Grasshopper Becoming Adult

This Grasshopper spent several weeks in a hibiscus plant on my patio, finding the plant to be nutritious as seen in my post Eating the Best Part. He did a job on the leaves, too.

Grasshopper, All Green
Grasshopper, August 3

When he started to turn brown it happened quickly.

Grasshopper, Turning Brown
Grasshopper, August 7

The last time I saw him he hadn’t changed much more, but he did show me his other side.

Grasshopper
Grasshopper, August 10

Seaside Dragonlets – Joined Pair, Part 2

Sharing a few more images of the tandem Seaside Dragonlets as they went about their reproductive business.

Dragonlets are in the Skimmer family and are unique in that they can breed in salt water. I suspect that this pond is brackish, with the level human-controlled with water added from a marsh on the tidal Cooper River.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

Seaside Dragonlets join together to oviposit. The female dabbed the edge of the pond multiple times, repeating back and forth along several yards ( 1-2 Meters) of the shore. Occasionally they took a break as in the first image above.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

I wondered if the little fish were eating the eggs as fast as they were being deposited.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

I couldn’t get any decent shots of the entire process; the presence of a rock border hid the water’s edge from my view.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

My first post: Seaside Dragonlets Joined Pair

Charleston, SC
August 2, 2021

Seaside Dragonlets – Joined Pair

Seaside Dragonlet is a new dragonfly to me, identified thanks to a Facebook group, Odonata of the Eastern United States.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

These two stayed attached while the female oviposited eggs at the edge of a pond.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

They took a few breaks and came right back to the same spot.

Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets
Joined Pair of Seaside Dragonlets

Charleston, SC
August 2, 2021