Tag Archives: Flowers

Wasp on Yellow Flower

I don’t know either the insect or this flower that was growing wild at the edge of a pond.

Wasp on Yellow Flower
Wasp on Yellow Flower

One of the wasp’s legs was sticking out at an unnatural looking angle, perhaps injured, but it wasn’t slowing him down.

Wasp on Yellow Flower
Wasp on Yellow Flower

He methodically worked the flower blossoms around the stem, unlike some insects that dart around, seemingly unsatisfied with what is in front of them.

Wasp on Yellow Flower
Wasp on Yellow Flower

Labyrinth: Yellow Path

The paths of the labyrinth at Mepkin Abby are currently created by a planting of yellow flowers, mostly Swamp Sunflowers,¬†Helianthus angustifolius. Seen from the Abby’s entrance road it looks like an unkempt field of wildflowers.

Labyrinth From Road
Labyrinth From Road

As you get closer the entrance to the labyrinth invites you in, where you are surrounded by peaceful yellow. In many places the flowers were up to my shoulders.

Entrance to the Labyrinth
Entrance to the Labyrinth

In early October the sunflowers and grasses were heavy with blooms, some sagging into the path.

Labyrinth Path
Labyrinth Path

I saw the sign after I had exited the path. I could see I made it about half way before feeling closed in, stepping over the edge in a thin spot along the back. I didn’t realize how many insects there would be and how many unknown plants I would need to brush up against. Long pants and sleeves would have been a good choice for this journey except it was 90 degrees F (32 C).

Labyrinth Sign
Labyrinth Sign – “It is solved by walking.”

From Mepkin Abby materials:

Mepkin Abby is a community of Roman Catholic monks established in 1949 on the site of the historic Mepkin Plantation on the Cooper River, north of Charleston, SC. The grounds and gardens are open daily to the public as part of their commitment to share their land.

This labyrinth is a seven circuit pattern and is a unicursal line that winds around itself with no dead ends. Follow the line all the way to the center, then reverse direction to exit.

Pond Reflections, A Touch of Pink

The past few weeks have been poor for getting new images; lots of grey days and thunderstorms at various times throughout the day, there are not many birds around, and the greater Charleston area has been mostly shut down since Monday due to the threat of Hurricane Florence.

I got a quick stroll in at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens on Sunday between rain storms. The air was still so the reflections in the ponds were pretty even though there wasn’t much light.

Pond at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
Pond at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens

Magnolia and all of my usual haunts are closed until the storm passes. Florence’s path and power for our area are still hard to predict but I expect I’ll see some changes when we are able to return.

Swallowtail Butterfly

These large red flowers are so flashy I almost didn’t see the butterfly. I believe the flower is a Texas Star Hibiscus, which grow wild around the edges of my favorite swamp.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

The butterfly was intensely inspecting the flowers, but he didn’t stay with any one blossom for more than a moment.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

An unopened bloom got its share of attention as the butterfly probed up under the flower’s sepals.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

That wasn’t very satisfying, either, and he quickly moved on.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

Many of the Buttonbush trees that were so popular with the butterflies in this area last July have died, and those that didn’t have very few blossoms. The harsh weather we had in January may have too much for them.