Tag Archives: Green

Resurrection Fern, On Brick

Resurrection Fern is the common name of the species Polypodium polypodioides, a plant  that grows on the surface of other plants and trees, and is most well known on Live Oaks around the Low Country of South Carolina. It springs to life when it rains, then slowly dries up, appearing dead.

Conversation with New Zealand blogger Ms. Liz about her post of a fern at Exploringcolour.wordpress.com/ has inspired me to work on ferns today. I thought I’d start small.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall

These fronds are typically 4 to 12 inches (10 to 30 centimeters) in length (National Wildlife Federation) and this particular collection was smaller.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall, Dried Magnolia Seed Pod

The images in today’s post are of the fern growing on this  brick wall that encloses a cemetery plot. A one inch (2.5 cm) plus rainfall the day before had worked its magic and the fern was looking quite lively. I suspect squirrels use this wall as a lunch spot accounting for the partially chewed Magnolia seed pod.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall, Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC

I’m using the term Resurrection Fern loosely here, as it appears to me there are multiple variations and I know nothing about more specific identification.

Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall
Resurrection Fern on Brick Wall

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC
December 31, 2021

I’ve posted about this fern a few times and it’s not uncommon for it to appear in other images along side a bird. Other Resurrection Fern Posts

 

Tree Frog On a Frond

Tree Frogs pick some risky places to hang out. This one was in plain sight and could easily be picked off by a clever bird.

Tree Frog on Frond
Tree Frog on Frond

However, there weren’t any birds about that I saw so his bigger risk might have been falling into the river.

Tree Frog on Frond
Tree Frog on Frond, Ashley River in the Background

From a different angle the frog looked like he had some more secure choices for his next leap.

Tree Frog on Frond
Tree Frog on Frond

Skinny Tree at Rest

I would never be surprised to find the Skinny Tree had succumbed to the elements and fallen into the pond. Happily, it made it through another wading bird nesting season,  providing a start to one Great Blue Heron chick in the top nest and five or six Great Egret chicks in at least two nests lower down.

All sorts of birds will use the tree as a perch for the next several months for fleeting moments. Come December the cycle will start again again when the Great Blue Herons start staking out nest sites and hopefully this tree will be around to participate.

The Skinny Tree, Ravenswood Pond
The Skinny Tree, Ravenswood Pond

It appears that the duck box has no bottom, so any Wood Ducks looking for a nesting spot will have to find another location.

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Charleston, SC
July 23, 2021