Tag Archives: Butterfly

Common Buckeye Butterfly

Common Buckeye Butterfly

Common Buckeye ButterflyBouncing gently on a grass frond this Common Buckeye seemed quite content to stay put.

Common Buckeye Butterfly
Common Buckeye Butterfly

This bit of tall grass was within a mowed area that I was able to walk around the other side and still he didn’t move.

Common Buckeye Butterfly
Common Buckeye Butterfly, Grey asphalt background

I haven’t seen many butterflies this summer and it was nice to watch this one for several minutes.

Common Buckeye Butterfly
Common Buckeye Butterfly

Black Swallowtail Butterfly

This Black Swallowtail Butterfly flitted along on the outside of the plants lining the walkway as I went along the edge of the pond, obscuring my view. Finally he landed in a fern and seemed to peak through the fronds.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly on Fern

He then moved to a more open area and spent some time on this statice type plant.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

The plant was down an embankment putting me even with the Butterfly for part of his feeding.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

The area just beyond these plants has recently been flooded as part of a plan to make an additional pond near the heron rookery. Next year the vegetation will likely be very different here.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

A year ago I captured similar images of butterfly and plant at a different pond about 25 miles (40 Kilometers) from this spot and thought the plant to be Brazilian Vervain (Verbena brasiliensis).  Black Swallowtail Butterfly is the post if you’d like to compare.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea

Azaleas have been planted all around the swamp, many of them bloom off and on through the summer, despite the heat. This reddish colored one was a perfect complement to a Swallowtail Butterfly.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea
Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea

The flowers must have been providing some nourishment as the Butterfly kept going around the bush.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea
Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea

He went deep into each blossom, his head disappearing behind the petals.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea
Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea

Then he gracefully backed out before moving on.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea
Swallowtail Butterfly on Azalea

Butterfly on Mimosa Tree

Butterflies do not know that Mimosa Trees are invasive and this Swallowtail happily partook of the pink fluffballs these trees are known for.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Mimosa
Swallowtail Butterfly on Mimosa

The flowers have a sweet smell that can be overpowering but this late afternoon a breeze was blowing it away from me.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Mimosa
Swallowtail Butterfly on Mimosa

The butterfly bounced along at the top of the tree then disappeared into another flower grouping in the shade.

Swallowtail Butterfly on Mimosa
Swallowtail Butterfly on Mimosa

Gulf Fritillary – October

At the end of the second week of October there were many Gulf Fritillary Butterflies still around.

Gulf Fritillary
Gulf Fritillary

Our temperatures have remained in the mid to high 80s during the day (27 plus C) which is above average for October. Only in the last few days have the nights gone down to 60 F (15 C).

Gulf Fritillary
Gulf Fritillary

Fortunately this favorite wildflower of the Fritillary is still blooming. Some lovely purple flowers just a few feet away had no attraction to this fellow.

Gulf Fritillary
Gulf Fritillary

Taken 10/09/2018, Charleston, SC.

Labyrinth: The Creatures

There were an amazing variety of insects hopping and flying around the flowers in the Mepkin Abbey Labyrinth.

Insect in the Labyrinth
Insect in the Labyrinth

The sunflowers made a beautiful yellow glow behind the blooms where the insects opted to land. This Buckeye’s colors were a nice match.

Buckeye in the Labyrinth
Buckeye in the Labyrinth

There were grasshopper type insects of several varieties and sizes. This fellow was at least four inches (ten centimeters) from head to tail and could easily leap into the next aisle of the labyrinth in a flash.

Insect in the Labyrinth
Insect in the Labyrinth

Several smaller butterflies, perhaps this is some type of skipper, were around inspecting the flowers.

Insect in the Labyrinth
Insect in the Labyrinth

There were some larger butterflies, I believe this is a Monarch. I was quite surprised that with all these insects I didn’t see any birds within the labyrinth looking for their own lunches.

Insect in the Labyrinth
Insect in the Labyrinth

Swallowtail Butterfly

These large red flowers are so flashy I almost didn’t see the butterfly. I believe the flower is a Texas Star Hibiscus, which grow wild around the edges of my favorite swamp.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

The butterfly was intensely inspecting the flowers, but he didn’t stay with any one blossom for more than a moment.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

An unopened bloom got its share of attention as the butterfly probed up under the flower’s sepals.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

That wasn’t very satisfying, either, and he quickly moved on.

Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus
Butterfly on Red Star Hibiscus

Many of the Buttonbush trees that were so popular with the butterflies in this area last July have died, and those that didn’t have very few blossoms. The harsh weather we had in January may have too much for them.

Butterflies Love It

I don’t know what this plant is but an assortment of butterflies and other insects were attracted to the puffy blooms.

Butterfly
Butterfly

The tufts from the flower heads made me think of thistle but the rest of the plant did not, with no sharp spines in sight.

Butterfly
Butterfly

This little yellow one was the smallest flying insect I saw. The bloom he picked had more of a purple tinge than the others, prettier or tastier perhaps.

Butterfly
Butterfly

The butterflies were all doing the same reaching into the tops of the flowers so they must have been getting something.

Pipevine Swallowtail
Pipevine Swallowtail (?)

This patch was two to three feet deep (0.5 – 1  meter) and ran along the edge of a pond. I could not see over the top from the mowed lawn where I was standing; I resisted getting closer due to the potential for alligators to be hidden in the greenery.

Attracting Butterflies
Attracting Butterflies

Butterfly

This butterfly was flitting along the trail, first ahead of me then behind me, not quite landing in a pose that I was hoping for.

Butterfly
Butterfly

I finally got his full open wings showing off the shimmery blue and then just a peek of the underside. There was a pretty stiff breeze blowing when he landed on this leaf and he was fighting to stay put.

Butterfly
Butterfly

Black Swallowtail Butterfly

These flowers look awful small to offer much to a butterfly but this one persisted, moving steadily from flower to flower. The lack of leaves on this plant gave me a clear view.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

He rotated and showed me every side while he was doing it.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

Even upside down!

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

He easily walked across the tops of the flowers.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

And hung off the side.

Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

I believe the plant is Brazilian Vervain (Verbena brasiliensis), a non-native plant that grows wild along roadsides, in disturbed areas, old fields. (NameThatPlant.net, A storehouse of information about native and naturalized plants of the Carolinas and Georgia.)