Tag Archives: Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbills

This is a broader view of one of the places I found Roseate Spoonbills feeding in October. The tall marsh reeds are intact behind them, hiding that there is a narrow road on the dike there, and another pond beyond that. Even the tallest photographers I know can’t see over those reeds and in some spots they are two feet thick.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

These Roseate Spoonbill images were taken from a dike that runs perpendicular to that main dike. I was standing where the reeds were less dense and some had been flattened by alligators climbing through them and wind and rain beating them down.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

As these birds were feeding the flock was constantly changing with one or two coming or going looking for “greener grass”.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills

Roseate Spoonbills Flying Over Marsh

A small flock of Roseate Spoonbills was flying low over the marsh headed for a drained area just in front of me.

Roseate Spoonbills in Flight
Roseate Spoonbills in Flight

I was hoping they would land but they kept going.

Roseate Spoonbills in Flight
Roseate Spoonbills in Flight

And going, passing by the spot where some shore birds had gathered and I had a good view. They landed just to my right, behind some reeds.

Roseate Spoonbills in Flight
Roseate Spoonbills in Flight

Click on any image for larger view.

Bear Island Wildlife Management Area, SC, 10/20/2018.

Dike Walk 2

These are a few more images from my walk down the dike on a grey day.

First we go right…

Wood Storks
Wood Storks

Then we go left…

Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills
Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills

and every now and then one of the birds has something to say!

Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills
Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills

These birds appeared to be successfully feeding and occasionally another would drop in to see what was going on.

Wood Stork Landing
Wood Stork Landing

Dike Walk

I could see bird activity down one of the dikes that divides the old rice field ponds where a canal widened a bit. The dike has varying heights of reeds at the edge which serves as a nice blind, but can interfere with a good shot. Hence the fuzz on the lower right of this image. The Cormorants took off just after I took this.

Wood Storks and Spoonbill
Wood Storks, Spoonbill and Cormorants

None of the images were great this day as the light was dull, but I saw a variety of activity.  A few Wood Storks came and went, sometimes feeding and sometimes just standing around.

Wood Storks
Wood Storks

The light brightened a little as this Roseate Spoonbill worked his way to the far side of this canal.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

For those of you who follow Ted at http://www.tpjPhoto.net, I got an image of him watching alligators for his  Bad Day To Be A Fish post. He’s standing on the road that runs at the lower edge of the big pond.

Ted with Alligators at his feet
Ted with Alligators at his feet

Incoming Spoonbill

This was not the weather morning we were expecting. We got to the wildlife management area shortly after sunrise to find that the air was still and dense with no sign of the promised sunshine.

Roseate Spoonbills in Tree
Roseate Spoonbills in Tree

However there were a few Spoonbills in the spoonie tree so you know I took some images.

Roseate Spoonbills in Tree
Roseate Spoonbills in Tree

I thought this one was going to land on the left branch but he kept going to one that was already occupied.

Roseate Spoonbills in Tree
Roseate Spoonbills in Tree

The two Spoonbills on the left took no notice of his arrival.

Roseate Spoonbills in Tree
Roseate Spoonbills in Tree