Tag Archives: South Carolina

Prothonotary Warbler on Knee

I returned to Beidler Forrest one morning this week hoping for another opportunity to see a Prothonotary Warbler or two. I did hear a few high in the tree tops but mostly they eluded me. The promised sun did not materialize, keeping the forest dark.

I did capture this one as it was returning to its nest, which the center staff pointed me to. The nest is down inside that Cypress knee. After a moment the adult dropped into the nest and stayed put for at least the next twenty minutes, likely laying on eggs.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

May 7, 2019.

Prothonotary Warbler in the Forest

The Prothonotary Warblers have returned to my area. Often you hear them before seeing them, even with this brilliant yellow.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

These images were taken at Beidler Forest which has many of the features these warblers like: tree cavities for nesting, damp forest floor, dense undergrowth and both standing and slow moving water.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

As I was leaving for the day one final Prothonotary Warbler crossed my path and perched on an open, if dimly lit, branch for a few moments.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

Anole, Shedding His Skin

This is probably a Carolina Anole, due to the bright green color. They have the ability to change to a duller green or brown, depending on the temperature and their environment.

Green Anole Shedding His Skin
Green Anole Shedding His Skin

This one is shedding his skin, which is brought on by growth: like other reptiles their skin doesn’t grow with them.

Green Anole Shedding His Skin
Green Anole Shedding His Skin

Anoles become less active when going through the shedding process and this one picked a dangerous spot at the edge of the swamp to just hang out. He would easily be seen by a passing bird who could snatch him up for lunch. I left before that happened.

Green Anole Shedding His Skin
Green Anole Shedding His Skin

Ravenel Bridge Across the Marsh

Charleston’s Ravenel Bridge is part of the landscape seen from the back of Magnolia Cemetery. The Cooper River runs under the bridge and creates the marsh that edges the cemetery, which is just barely above the level of the river.

Ravenel Bridge, Charleston
Ravenel Bridge, Charleston

A storm was predicted for the morning I was there but the clouds drifted higher before anything dramatic looking happened.

Ravenel Bridge, Charleston
Ravenel Bridge, Charleston

May 3, 2019

Wild Pink

Wild flowers have been allowed to grow unmolested by the lawnmower at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston and this morning there were more types than I ever remember seeing there. A nice patch of these pink beauties, perhaps some kind of mallow, caught my eye.

Wild Pink
Wild Pink

A single bloom off on its own shows  delicate pink shades.

Wild Pink
Wild Pink

The ground was dry and after scanning for snakes, ants and other creatures I got down on the ground for a few images

Wild Pink
Wild Pink

Click any image for a larger view.

The Long White Bridge, 2019

Photographing this iconic spot at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens with Azaleas in bloom is all about timing. The flower blooms, the light, the stillness of the water, the absence of people on the bridge– all things we have no control over. It’s a lovely spot and I tend to take a few captures whenever I pass by, even if the flowers aren’t in bloom.

Long White Bridge and Azaleas
Long White Bridge and Azaleas

Taken 3/22/2019

Ravenswood Pond, Puffy Clouds

The sky was filled with fluffy white clouds and the water was still, making beautiful reflections.

Both images were taken from the more manicured short side of this rectangular man-made pond, looking towards the far end. The corner where I took the first one widens a bit into an overflow outlet where I was standing.

Ravenswood Pond, White Puffy Clouds
Ravenswood Pond, White Puffy Clouds

The second image was taken from the other end of that short side. The trees standing in the water and small island are home to many of the wading bird nests I photograph.

Ravenswood Pond, White Puffy Clouds
Ravenswood Pond, White Puffy Clouds

April 5, 2019

Rice Field Canal, Two Views

The old rice fields along South Carolina’s coast that are maintained as part of the wildlife management areas are connected by canals and the water flow is controlled by opening  or closing a series of “trunks.”

Taken March 28, trees are budding and leafing out all around but there are still a lot of brown dead reeds from last year on the edges of the canals.

Canal Behind Trunk
Canal Behind Trunk

This second view is the same canal from a slightly different angle without the trunk.

Rice Field Canal
Rice Field Canal