Tag Archives: South Carolina

Orange-yellow Canna Lily

There is a small patch of Canna Lilies at the edge of the big field at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens. It’s a wet spot and the lilies and cattails seem pretty happy there.

Orange Canna Lily with Cattails
Orange Canna Lily with Cattails

This dragonfly found an unfurled blossom a nice place to perch on a hot day. True to form he lifted off just as I was ready to shoot then returned to the exact same spot,

Orange Canna Lily Bud with Dragonfly
Orange Canna Lily Bud with Dragonfly

The orange and yellow combination of the flowers is quite attractive, shouting out “summer!”

Orange Canna Lily Bloom
Orange Canna Lily Bloom

Out of a Rut

Ted and I have been visiting the Donnelley Wildlife Management Area regularly for almost three years. Somehow we always take the same few routes. The place is huge, just over 8000 acres, and yesterday we tried a new walking trail which starts in some woods overrun with mosquitoes then opens up to this!

Rice Field Ponds and Clouds
Rice Field Ponds and Clouds – click for larger view

The puffy clouds reflecting in the old rice field ponds were the perfect touch for some landscape photos. Several walkable dikes wind around the ponds and we saw a wide variety of birds, a few Alligators, and two Armadillos. And not another human being.

Rice Field Ponds and Clouds
Rice Field Ponds and Clouds – click for larger view

The Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston

Built in 1905, The Gibbes Museum of Art refers to theĀ  dome that crowns the Rotunda Gallery as “Tiffany Era.” It seems the sought after Tiffany markings are not to be found based on the museum’s news articles about a recent renovation that included cleaning the dome.

The Dome, The Gibbes Museum of Art
The Dome, The Gibbes Museum of Art, Rotunda Gallery

I took the image above standing on the big fleur-de-lis in this next image and looking up. I wanted to lay on the floor but thought it might be frowned on.

The floor is tile, that was (gasp!) covered in brown linoleum along with the beautiful woodwork being painted white sometime in the 1950s or early 1960.

Rotunda Gallery
Rotunda Gallery

This view out the huge windows in the front shows a hint of the neighboring Circular Church, another architectural beauty in Charleston.

View Out Second Floor, The Gibbes Museum of Art
View Out Second Floor, The Gibbes Museum of Art

White-eyed Vireo

White-eyed Vireos are small {0.3-0.5 oz (10-14 g)} song birds that are usually difficult to spot due to their preferred habitat of thickets and scrubby trees. I could hear this one singing just in front of me on a narrow path and was surprised to see him on an open branch.

White-eyed Vireo
White-eyed Vireo

And when he flew I could still see him!

White-eyed Vireo
White-eyed Vireo

Although White-eyed Vireo was my first thought, I used the Merlin Bird ID app to verify the ID.

Prothonotary Warbler on Knee

I returned to Beidler Forrest one morning this week hoping for another opportunity to see a Prothonotary Warbler or two. I did hear a few high in the tree tops but mostly they eluded me. The promised sun did not materialize, keeping the forest dark.

I did capture this one as it was returning to its nest, which the center staff pointed me to. The nest is down inside that Cypress knee. After a moment the adult dropped into the nest and stayed put for at least the next twenty minutes, likely laying on eggs.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

May 7, 2019.

Prothonotary Warbler in the Forest

The Prothonotary Warblers have returned to my area. Often you hear them before seeing them, even with this brilliant yellow.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

These images were taken at Beidler Forest which has many of the features these warblers like: tree cavities for nesting, damp forest floor, dense undergrowth and both standing and slow moving water.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

As I was leaving for the day one final Prothonotary Warbler crossed my path and perched on an open, if dimly lit, branch for a few moments.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

Anole, Shedding His Skin

This is probably a Carolina Anole, due to the bright green color. They have the ability to change to a duller green or brown, depending on the temperature and their environment.

Green Anole Shedding His Skin
Green Anole Shedding His Skin

This one is shedding his skin, which is brought on by growth: like other reptiles their skin doesn’t grow with them.

Green Anole Shedding His Skin
Green Anole Shedding His Skin

Anoles become less active when going through the shedding process and this one picked a dangerous spot at the edge of the swamp to just hang out. He would easily be seen by a passing bird who could snatch him up for lunch. I left before that happened.

Green Anole Shedding His Skin
Green Anole Shedding His Skin