Tag Archives: Landscape

The Skinny Tree, Down The Pond

Just as it was starting to rain and we were heading out  a Great Blue Heron landed in the Skinny Tree. It was a long, soft shot, but I do like all the colors around the edge of the pond.

Great Blue Heron in Skinny Tree
Great Blue Heron in Skinny Tree, Few Ducks in the Water

If you zoom in you’ll see that all of last year’s nesting material is gone from the tree. The GBH nest was where the Heron is standing; Great Egrets built three nests lower down, one on top of the Wood Duck box. I expect a Great Blue Heron pair will start building it up soon as this has been one of the prime nesting sites on this pond for many years.

Sunset Over Marsh

I was standing on the eastern end of Folly Island, facing the marsh behind the barrier island. The pool of water in the foreground has been created by the shifting shape of this beach where a low spot has recently been carved out above the normal high tide line. Tidal action and storms continuously change the barrier islands and I won’t be surprised if the next big storm carves a piece of this land into its own island or washes it away completely.

Sunset Over Marsh
Sunset Over Marsh

Man, Raptor, Dolphin Using the River

There was a lot of activity to be seen on a late afternoon boat ride into the Harbor River from Russ Point on Hunting Island, SC even as the day came to an end.

From the beach near the dock a fisherman was casting into the river.

Fly Fisherman
Fly Fisherman

A Bald Eagle watched over the river and surrounding marsh from a dead tree.

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

A pod of Dolphins was all around us as we set out, probably fishing for the last meal of the day.

Dolphin Tale
Dolphin Tale

Off in the distance it was raining.

Sun Rain Clouds
Sun Rain Clouds

The Harbor River is at the southern end of the Ashepoo-Combahee-Edisto (ACE) Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve.

The Reserve’s 99,308 acres of pine and hardwood upland, oyster reef, forested wetland, barrier islands, cypress swamp, and tidal marsh combine to make this one of the largest undeveloped estuaries on the East Coast and home to many endangered species.