Tag Archives: Landscape

Pond Reflections, A Touch of Pink

The past few weeks have been poor for getting new images; lots of grey days and thunderstorms at various times throughout the day, there are not many birds around, and the greater Charleston area has been mostly shut down since Monday due to the threat of Hurricane Florence.

I got a quick stroll in at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens on Sunday between rain storms. The air was still so the reflections in the ponds were pretty even though there wasn’t much light.

Pond at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
Pond at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens

Magnolia and all of my usual haunts are closed until the storm passes. Florence’s path and power for our area are still hard to predict but I expect I’ll see some changes when we are able to return.

Rust of Time

Opened in 1850, Charleston’s Magnolia Cemetery is now home to an abundance of decaying monuments and fences. The shapes and colors make them all beautiful.

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston
Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, Crepe Myrtle adding a dash of pink

I doubt the original mourners could have envisioned the current state of their loved ones’ resting places in this older section of the cemetery. Even payment for perpetual care, which is marked on many of the plots, has not prevented the ravages of time.

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston
Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston

What will it look like in another 150 years?

Methodist Campground

A circle of 99 rustic numbered “camps” form the Indian Fields Methodist Campground on a ten acre (four hectare) site in St. George, South Carolina. Indian Fields was built in 1848 and has been a site for religious gatherings continuously since then.

This site is used just one week a year; there is electricity and running indoor indoor to sinks only. Privies, also numbered, are out back, across the road.

Indian Fields Methodist Campground
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Pine trees stand straight, towering above the camps, sentinels to the passage of time. The buildings have no ornamentation and the rusting metal roofs were the only sign of color not provided by nature.

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Indian Fields Methodist Campground

This view from the porch of camp #25 shows how meager the buildings are. Even if their doors were closed there were numerous other openings into the interiors. I kept expecting to get startled by a bird or other creature that had taken up residence, but saw nothing.

Indian Fields Methodist Campground
Indian Fields Methodist Campground

This last view is from outside the circle where the  cooking quarters all face outward to the circular road. The kitchens have been modified more than other parts of the camps over time with sinks, stoves, and storage compartments. I imagine that food is a big part of the social aspect of the annual gathering.

Indian Fields Methodist Campground
Indian Fields Methodist Campground

Taken 7/8/2018, Sony Alpha-6500, processed to have an old postcard look.

9/2/18 Note: I edited this post last evening to change 100 to 99 in the first sentence after Ted mentioned my error. I foolishly used the WP interface on my iPad and the post got all scrambled up and the  last two images didn’t display. My apologies for presenting a mess.

Spoonbill Tree: Empty

It was a beautiful morning at this old rice field pond even if there weren’t many birds out. It was hot so they had reason to stay tucked in elsewhere.

Pond
Old Rice Field Pond

This tree has become known as the Spoonbill Tree as it is a favorite perching and thus photography spot. The water is very high; often there are two or three alligators lounging on the ground up near the trunk.

Empty Tree
Empty Tree

See Early Morning Pond for a view of this tree taken last October with the roots exposed.

Grove House: Front

In 1825 George Washington Morris, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, became the ninth owner of the land that he named Grove Plantation. Three years later he built Grove House. These images are the front of the house, taken from the extensive tree lined lawn from the left, center, and right.

Grove House at Grove Plantation
Grove House at Grove Plantation

As you move away from the building the massive Live Oaks close in quickly, giving a feeling of seclusion. The second floor porch that runs the full width of the house is very inviting and the wide overhang would have helped keep the home cooler during the South Carolina summers.

Grove House at Grove Plantation
Grove House at Grove Plantation

The house has survived numerous hurricanes and the wrath of the Civil War, during which many similar estates were torched.

Grove House
Grove House at Grove Plantation

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