Tag Archives: Sony Alpha 6500

Creeping Shadows

This was late in the afternoon and it was mostly quiet on the pond. You can just make out the half moon hanging. The water was still, creating a nice reflection except where the duck weed gathered.

Ravenswood Pond Late Afternoon
Ravenswood Pond Late Afternoon

About 2 hours later the second image was taken from the side of the pond, about half way down. White Ibis were gathering in one of the far trees for the night and the light was disappearing fast.

Ravenswood Pond Sun Going Down
Ravenswood Pond Sun Going Down

I was on my way out and by the time I got back to where the first image was taken there were at least 100 Ibis in that tree. It was cool to watch but not enough light to photograph.

Garden Pond Reflections

This is the same garden pond taken the same day as yesterday’s Sepia Pond post. Taken from different angles towards the water and a quarter way round the pond, the reflections were much different.

Garden Pond with White Bridge and Statue
Garden Pond with White Bridge and Statue

Crossing over the white bridge leads to a path that runs along the side of the rice field canal and eventually all the way around the impoundment.

Garden Pond with White Bridge
Garden Pond with White Bridge, Statue is behind the Spanish Moss

Pond Sunrise

It had been our intention to be at a different pond when the sun came up but between getting out the door a few minutes late and a truck ahead of us that was indecisive that didn’t happen. I don’t think our original destination could have been any prettier than this. Unless there was a bird, or two, in the water.

Sunrise Over Marsh Pond
Sunrise Over Marsh Pond

Donnelley Wildlife Management Area, SC
Taken 10/14/2018

Cypress Methodist Campground

I visited another of South Carolina’s Methodist campgrounds last week. It turns out there are quite a few still operating around the area.

It is immediately obvious that Cypress Methodist Campground is different from Indian Fields Methodist Campground as the “tents” are in a rectangle rather than a circular arrangement and it feels less unified.

Cypress Methodist Campground
Cypress Methodist Campground

This section in the first corner is dominated by a giant Live Oak tree dripping with Spanish Moss.

Some other differences that became apparent as I wandered the grounds were the newer metal roofs on many of the camps, locks on the doors as the result of vandalism, and the lack of front porches on most of the cabins.

Cypress Methodist Campground
Cypress Methodist Campground

Another difference is that the associated church building and a small grave yard are on the same property.

Cypress Methodist Church
Cypress Methodist Church, Ridgeville, SC

Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist: Inside

The Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist was open the day I discovered it and as I stepped inside I was somewhat overcome by the size. Many of Charleston’s churches welcome visitors to view their interiors, often with knowledgeable guides on hand, as well as for spiritual reasons.

Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist
Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist

I saw no one here, and saw no welcome sign, either. The interior is an amazing work of art and craftsmanship. I took a few images and went on my way.

Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist
Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist

Rust of Time

Opened in 1850, Charleston’s Magnolia Cemetery is now home to an abundance of decaying monuments and fences. The shapes and colors make them all beautiful.

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston
Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, Crepe Myrtle adding a dash of pink

I doubt the original mourners could have envisioned the current state of their loved ones’ resting places in this older section of the cemetery. Even payment for perpetual care, which is marked on many of the plots, has not prevented the ravages of time.

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston
Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston

What will it look like in another 150 years?

Methodist Campground

A circle of 99 rustic numbered “camps” form the Indian Fields Methodist Campground on a ten acre (four hectare) site in St. George, South Carolina. Indian Fields was built in 1848 and has been a site for religious gatherings continuously since then.

This site is used just one week a year; there is electricity and running indoor indoor to sinks only. Privies, also numbered, are out back, across the road.

Indian Fields Methodist Campground
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Pine trees stand straight, towering above the camps, sentinels to the passage of time. The buildings have no ornamentation and the rusting metal roofs were the only sign of color not provided by nature.

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Indian Fields Methodist Campground

This view from the porch of camp #25 shows how meager the buildings are. Even if their doors were closed there were numerous other openings into the interiors. I kept expecting to get startled by a bird or other creature that had taken up residence, but saw nothing.

Indian Fields Methodist Campground
Indian Fields Methodist Campground

This last view is from outside the circle where the  cooking quarters all face outward to the circular road. The kitchens have been modified more than other parts of the camps over time with sinks, stoves, and storage compartments. I imagine that food is a big part of the social aspect of the annual gathering.

Indian Fields Methodist Campground
Indian Fields Methodist Campground

Taken 7/8/2018, Sony Alpha-6500, processed to have an old postcard look.

9/2/18 Note: I edited this post last evening to change 100 to 99 in the first sentence after Ted mentioned my error. I foolishly used the WP interface on my iPad and the post got all scrambled up and the  last two images didn’t display. My apologies for presenting a mess.