Tag Archives: Sony Alpha 6500

Waiting for Dawn

When we arrived at Mary’s Pond about 20 minutes before sunrise on Wednesday this group of Wood Storks with a single Great Blue Heron was huddled in a canal that runs along side the pond.

Wood Storks and Great Blue Heron
Wood Storks and Great Blue Heron – click image for larger view

The Heron flew off shortly after I took this photo. As it got lighter the Wood Storks started wading down the canal out of my sight.

Sony Alpha 6500, 18-105 mm at 105 mm, F4, ISO 3200

The Skinny Tree has Occupants

A pair of Great Blue Herons have started a nest in the “skinny tree.” On December 28 I posted that this tree hadn’t sparked much interest among the nesting birds.

These were shot with the Sony Alpha 6500, 55-210 mm lens at 1/1000 sec, 129mm.

Great Blue Heron Pair Nesting
Great Blue Heron Pair Nesting

The leafless trees in the background reflect a very harsh light which I toned down with Lightroom and Color FX Pro.

Great Blue Heron Pair Nesting
Great Blue Heron Pair Nesting

The male had a successful landing but the female had to brace herself to keep her footing.

Great Blue Heron Pair Nesting
Great Blue Heron Pair Nesting

This pair may only be testing each other out as mates. Despite bringing sticks for the nest and some attention to the female, the male flew off to take a stick to another tree.¬† The female didn’t look pleased and eventually flew off and came back with her own stick.

White Ibis 2

Now that I’ve gotten more comfortable with the Sony Alpha 6500 for landscape images I’m spending some time working with the 55-200 mm lens for bird photos. Making adjustments is less intuitive than the Canon gear I’ve become accustomed to, but these Ibis were just hanging around which gave me some time to think about what I was doing.

White Ibis
White Ibis – click on image for larger view

In addition to the poser above, several Ibis were pecking at the edge of the pond. Their blue eyes are one of these birds’ claim to fame.

White Ibis
White Ibis – click on image for larger view

I don’t usually do this but in this last image I did edit out the poop on his back side. The White Ibis are so white that it just bothered me.

White Ibis
White Ibis – click on image for larger view

I’m making progress but more practice is definitely in order!

Pond Reflections 2

Today had none of the brilliance of my last images from these spots: it was grey and few sprinkles of rain had graced us. But the pond was just as still and the reflections as clear.

Pond Reflections on Grey Day
Pond Reflections on Grey Day

Our recent cold weather has slowed the nesting activity with only a few herons tending to nests today.

Pond Reflections on Grey Day
Pond Reflections on Grey Day

01/10/2018

Click on photo for larger view

Taken with the Sony Alpha 6500, 18-105 Lens, Processed in Lightroom and NIK Color FX Pro 4.

Magnolia Cemetery

It’s not just the fences that are works of art at Magnolia Cemetery. Statues and monuments giving tribute to the departed of all ages¬† are scattered throughout all of the sections.

Eternal Rest
Eternal Rest

The lush landscaping and massive trees, evident even in December, add to the peaceful feeling of the cemetery. I’m usually more interested in the birds that share this space when we walk here but the man-made beauty attracted my camera this day.

Magnolia Cemetery
Magnolia Cemetery

Charleston, SC, December 2017.

Fences Between Neighbors

Many of the borders of family plots in older sections of Charleston’s Magnolia Cemetery are marked by decorative metal fences. The styles are as varied as the families must have been and all are in some state of decay.

This fence with a Lyre and Star motif is particularly intricate. Sadly a large chunk of it is gone.

Lyre and Star Fence
Lyre and Star Fence

The cemetery is dotted with centuries old Live Oaks and giant Magnolias that take a toll on the fences and stone work below with every big storm that passes over Charleston.

Lyre and Star Fence Gate
Lyre and Star Fence Gate

From the cemetery’s website:

Magnolia Cemetery first opened in 1850. It is on the land of a former rice plantation. The property was designed during a new rural cemetery movement that crossed from Europe to America in the mid-19th century. With lovingly landscaped paths and ponds, trees and green space, Charlestonians would come to Magnolia to picnic and play, as well as visit lost loved ones.

Aside from status, the fences may have been a way to protect a wealthy family’s plot from the picnickers. The cemetery occupies over 130 acres at the edge of a marsh on the Cooper river and it remains a beautiful spot to visit.

Lyre and Star Fence
Lyre and Star Fence

Click on any photo for larger view.

Pond Reflections

We changed our plan on Friday and I’m so glad we did. We were going to walk the dike around the old rice fields but after seeing the Great Blue Herons starting to nest on Thursday we headed to the rookery first.

The light was spectacular and the pond was as still as glass.

Pond Reflections
Pond Reflections – view from the corner where you first arrive

There was some bird activity but the landscape opportunities were what got my attention.

Pond Reflections
Pond Reflections with Great Blue Heron Flying Low

Click on photo for larger view

Taken with the Sony Alpha 6500, 18-105 Lens, Processed in Lightroom and NIK Color FX Pro 4.