All posts by Ellen Jennings

Lines

Lines created by the weathered planks  in the siding, water wheel and fence of this mill go in every direction.

Leonard's Mills
Leonard’s Mills

The water wheel is a work of art as well as a mechanical feat that powers a working saw.

Leonard's Mills
Leonard’s Mills

Approaching the mill from the other side of the stream gives a broader view of the building’s colors and textures of the siding.

Leonard's Mills
Leonard’s Mills

The Maine Forest and Logging Museum in Bradley has a variety of exhibits intended “to preserve, celebrate and educate people about the sustainable forest culture of Maine.”

http://www.maineforestandloggingmuseum.org

August 25, 2017. Click on any photo for larger view.

Reflections of a Spoonbill

Still water, perfect light and a position on a berm above the pond for me yielded some lovely reflections of this Roseate Spoonbill taking a stroll.

Roseate Spoonbill Reflection
Roseate Spoonbill Reflection

He was in no particular hurry, just wandered along

Roseate Spoonbill Reflection
Roseate Spoonbill Reflection

When he moved into the water a small ripple formed behind him.

Roseate Spoonbill Reflection
Roseate Spoonbill Reflection

Do they see that bird looking back at them?

Click on any photo for larger view.

10/08/2017

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Posing

While I was watching Spoonbills in the pond in front of me this fellow banked around me and came in for a landing, taking up a spot in a beat up tree behind me.

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

Not surprisingly the Night-Herons like darker, secluded spots when they are out in the day time.

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

He shifted around a bit before settling into a one-legged pose. I saw a juvenile fly in behind the adult but never did spot him in this grove.

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

Spoonbill Making His Own Shower

Roseate Spoonbills are still around in a couple Wildlife Management Areas we visit along the coast of South Carolina. The bird resources all indicate that they don’t belong here, especially not well into fall, but we have seen flocks of six to forty.

This one was taking advantage of a shallow pond to get cleaned up.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

He went through this ritual five or six times that I watched. Too much water in the air becomes blown out in the sun and behind him was shaded so I didn’t get much scenery to go with the shower. This development of the photos adds to the action.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

He moved an amazing volume of water flapping his wings up and down.

Roseate Spoonbill
Roseate Spoonbill

Click on any photo for larger view.

More Wood Ducks

I didn’t expect to see a male Wood Duck in breeding plumage in September. This fellow was paddling back and forth in a small pond, looking around.

Wood Duck
Wood Duck
He very nicely showed off both sides and created a lovely reflection in the still water. This pond was cleared of invasive overgrowth over the summer and I’m hopeful more ducks will visit over the winter.

Wood Duck
Wood Duck
In another larger pond a short distance away a few females or juveniles were also just swimming around.

Wood Duck
Wood Ducks

Duck Sky

There we were enjoying the view of Spoonbills, Egrets and Herons and then the sky exploded with a flock of Blue-winged Teals. I didn’t even know what they were at first and was surprised to see the flock move like a unit once they got above the tree line.

Blue-winged Teals
Blue-winged Teals

Some of the wading birds joined in – click photos for larger view. Regrettably, we couldn’t get closer to where they landed for a view of them in the water.

Blue-winged Teals
Blue-winged Teals

10/01/2017

Follow The Leader

It was a glorious morning. A flock of Spoonbills was feeding in one of the wildlife management area ponds led by one bird along the edge of a sandbar. A gathering of Ibis, Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets were partially hidden in the grass behind them.

Roseate Spoonbills
Roseate Spoonbills – click photo for larger view

All of the birds worked their way towards the other side of the pond, some a few at a time, others in groups. Below, Spoonbills and Ibis lifted off together.

Roseate Spoonbills and Ibis
Roseate Spoonbills and Ibis  – click photo for larger view

This was one of the first cool (60 degrees F) mornings we’ve had this fall. That along with a stiff breeze kept the mosquitoes away adding to the morning’s pleasure.

Taken 10/01/2017.